Grants Awarded in 2014 – Congratulations to the following!

Dr. Steven Grover: $448,245 from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research for his study Canadian Health Improvement Network to Upgrade Prevention Services (CHIN-UPS) Evaluating a multidisciplinary health promotion program in community pharmacies

Dr. Nandini Dendukuri
(with Lawrence Joseph):  $256,932  from CIHR – "Statistical methods to support diagnosis of childhood tuberculosis in the absence of a gold-standard reference"


Dr. Nitika Pai: $198,394 (2 years) from CIHR HIV/AIDS Research Initiative – "Evaluation of an HIV self-testing strategy in community clinics for men who have sex with men"

Dr. Kaberi Dasgupta:  $200,000 from the Lawson Foundation Diabetes Funding Opportunity – "The MoMMii study. Effects of a multimodal diabetes prevention intervention on families with a history of gestational diabetes"

Serene Joseph  (Theresa Gyorkos’ PhD Student): $10,000 from CIHR Planning and Dissemination Grant - Institute Community Support – "Informing policy and practice on deworming in early preschool-age children: from local to global audiences"   

Dr. Louise Pilote: $40,000 from the Heart and Stroke Foundation – HAVEN, "Hypertension in the very elderly men and women trial"

Dr. Sasha Bernatsky: $10,000 from the CIHR (Planning and Dissemination Grant - Institute Community Support) – "Long-term Outcomes for Mothers with Rheumatic Diseases and their offspring"  

Dr. Anne-Sophie Brazeau (Kaberi Dasgupta's post-doctoral student):  $40,000 per year two-year post doc award from the Heart and Stroke Foundation to work on the MoMMii study.

Dr. Susan Bartlett (with Dr. Clifton Bingham at Johns Hopkins University): $700,000 from PCORI – “Making PROMIS Meaningful to Patients and Providers in Clinical Practice”

Drs. Lesley Fellows and Nancy Mayo: $50,000 from the Heart and Stroke Foundation – Getting stroke care pathways on the right track: Shifting the focus from processes to outcomes.









The CAnadian Network for Advanced Interdisciplinary Methods for comparative effectiveness research (CAN-AIM) team was funded by CIHR to develop novel methods using prospective longitudinal cohorts and to respond to key knowledge gaps regarding drug safety and effectiveness by answering queries which arise from Health Canada and other regulatory parties. Our demonstration project looked at the comparative effectiveness of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents versus traditional disease-modifying agents (DMARDs) in reducing orthopedic surgery in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

For information on our preliminary results or for more information on our team, please visit our website http://canaim.ca/ or contact Autumn Neville at autumn.neville@clinepi.mcgill.ca.





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